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2018-01-05 256 views
http://www.umakemehungry.com/2018/01/pin-pin-hiong.htmlWe chanced by the corner of the street and notice there is a long queue outside Pin Pin Hiong. We joined the crowd and waited for about 20 minutes before getting a table ourselves. The reason for the queue perhaps is due to the precise cooking method of the chefs who insist to cook order by order, bowl by bowl instead of "mass producing". Their Menu is rather limited but still attracting a good crowd.  The interior looks like our (Singapore)
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http://www.umakemehungry.com/2018/01/pin-pin-hiong.html

We chanced by the corner of the street and notice there is a long queue outside Pin Pin Hiong. We joined the crowd and waited for about 20 minutes before getting a table ourselves. The reason for the queue perhaps is due to the precise cooking method of the chefs who insist to cook order by order, bowl by bowl instead of "mass producing".

Their Menu is rather limited but still attracting a good crowd.

 The interior looks like our (Singapore) Coffeeshops in the 90s with old school kind of ceiling fans and switches. Even their tiles were so old school.

The kitchen is very open and you can see that the one who standing beside the stove is an elderly man who cook in rhythm and his son. They were very focus on the dishes. Besides that, the elderly woman (assuming the wife of the man) is helping on the miscellaneous. Taking orders and serving dishes were done by their 2 maids.

Mee Sua is something that most diners had on their table. Soup was tasty topped with fried lard to perk up its aroma. As most Mee Sua Soup will turn salty due to the nature of the noodles, the combination of ingredients in the bowl and noodles make things sweet. Cooking Mee Sua is quite tricky as timing is quite important. If it gets a little over cook, these Mee Sua will turn soggy.

Mee Sua Soup - RM 7.00 (Small)
RM7
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Ingredients in the bowl of our breakfast includes lean pork meat, liver, prawns, pig's stomach, vegetables and mushrooms.

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We ordered their "Wah Tan Ho" aka fried Kway Teow with egg. Gravy was quite ordinary and ingredients used were similar to what we had in the Mee Sua soup.

Kway Teow - RM 7.00 (Small)
RM7
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 The chinese version of oyster egg is fluffy but a tad oily. Taking a closer look into the kitchen, the chef beside this fluffy plate will be the young chap - the boss's son. Oyster Egg is tasty and the use of oysters were generous. To add on, I got to enjoy pieces of them on every bite I had.

Oyster Omelette - RM 6.00 / 9.00 / 12.00
RM6
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I would say their food is Asian's comfort food, heart winning. It reminds us of a childhood taste even though food was simple and homely. It might not be the most delicious in the streets but at least it had given our stomach a good warming up for the morning. I can say its definitely not a tourist as everything there looked humble.
(The above review is the personal opinion of a user which does not represent OpenRice's point of view.)
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DETAILED RATING
Taste
Decor
Service
Hygiene
Value
Dining Method
Dine In
Spending Per Head
RM7 (Breakfast)
Recommended Dishes
Mee Sua Soup - RM 7.00 (Small)
RM 7
Kway Teow - RM 7.00 (Small)
RM 7
Oyster Omelette - RM 6.00 / 9.00 / 12.00
RM 6
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