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Embarking on a mini adventure in search of fragrant curry along the bustling Masjid Jamek LRT station, this was one of the South Indian restaurants that we stumbled into which caught our eyes in on a fine sunny afternoon. Reasons were simple:1. 100% Indian customers (became 99% or less after we sat down), i.e. a positive indicator for no-nonsense authenticity without down-grading the spiciness of curries and gravies 2. air-conditioner dining was offered upstairs (though we decided to stay on gr
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Embarking on a mini adventure in search of fragrant curry along the bustling Masjid Jamek LRT station, this was one of the South Indian restaurants that we stumbled into which caught our eyes in on a fine sunny afternoon. Reasons were simple:
1. 100% Indian customers (became 99% or less after we sat down), i.e. a positive indicator for no-nonsense authenticity without down-grading the spiciness of curries and gravies
2. air-conditioner dining was offered upstairs (though we decided to stay on ground floor to catch the local atmosphere)
3. this place simply looks more spacey (especially for customers like us who enjoy having more plates on our table)
4. colourful Indian sweets on display (pleasing to my eyes)


Vegetarian Banana Leaf Rice
Without much waiting, we dived straight into our personal favourites: vegetarian banana leaf rice and masala thosai. Of course, being a typical family-run local South Indian restaurant, service was really fast and curt (our waiter almost sprang into action right after we placed our order). Referring to the serving process below, the portion was obviously generous. In fact, the scooping literally continued until it was 'stopped' with both thumbs up. What made dining here an awesome experience was none other than the atmosphere. The carefree-ness of people watching, freedom of helping yourself with more servings of dhall, coconut chutney and curries, indifferent service provided by the waiters regardless of whether you are a local or tourist.
Cost: approx. RM7
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Masala Thosai
Next comes the masala thosai. At first glace it was absolutely nothing to brag about. In fact the only thing to brag was probably the fact that using banana leaf is more environmental-friendly. However, with the saving grace from very saucy masala wrapped in the thosai, it turned out to be delicious after all. Check out the variance between the fluff and the crispy ghee at different parts of the thosai. Oh man, don't I love the free flow of dhall flooding my thosai!

Cost: approx RM5
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Sweets
Not too satisfied with leaving too quickly and feeling that we have yet to warm our seats further, we decided to finish the meal off with a few selection of typical Indian sweets such as baluhashi (bottom right), barfi (top left), ghee-based sweet dumpling. While not many parts of the world appreciate the use of spice in making desserts (which are normally used in making savoury dishes instead), what really distinguishes Indian sweets from any other conventional Malaysian desserts are indeed attributed to its intriguing and abundance application of spices especially cinnamon, cardamom, saffron to perfection.
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Satisfied, we left Bakti Woodlands and surely, this was indeed a no-nonsense place to enjoy an affordable and hearty meal, not to mention a place for hardcore vegetarians.
(The above review is the personal opinion of a user which does not represent OpenRice's point of view.)
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Date of Visit
2011-04-30